FAQs – Limited Conservatorship, General & COVID-19 Specific

-Question
I have a child with a Developmental Delay. He/she needs some assistance with his/her personal needs and activities of daily living. Can I do that without the Court’s involvement?

Answer
You can assist your child as much as he/she requires, and you desire/are able to. However, in order to make legal decisions on his behalf, such as signing contracts in SSI applications, Medi Cal or other public benefits; or medical or education consents to list a few, you must be appointed by a judge as a Conservator (legal guardian for an adult with a disability) in a limited conservatorship.

-Question
 What is a Limited Conservatorship?

Answer
A limited conservatorship is a conservatorship that applies only to adults with developmental delays and whose conditions arose before the age of 18.  The court grants limited conservatorship to a responsible adult (known as the Conservator) and with that comes the right of the Conservator to make decisions on behalf of the adult with the disability.

A limited conservatorship is called ‘limited’ because a set of specific powers are requested and granted to the Conservator.  Also, it is called a limited conservatorship because the purpose is to “promote the independence of the disabled adult”.

-Question
What types of decisions can a Conservator make when caring for the adult with the disability?

Answer
In a limited conservatorship, the judge will grant the responsible adult (i.e. the Conservator), the power to make certain decisions on behalf of the adult with the disability (i.e. the ‘Conservatee’). The judge will grant the following powers in a limited conservatorship, and thus the Conservator can make decisions related to the following:

  1. Decide where the conservatee is best suited to live (i.e. group home, personal residence, with a family member, etc.).
  2. Have access to confidential records.
  3. Sign contracts and enter contracts on their behalf.
  4. Consent to medical treatments and procedures. (except sterilization – you must get a court order to sterilize an adult with a disability even with a conservatorship)
  5. Decisions regarding the adult’s education.
  6. Decisions related to the Conservatee in Marriage. (NOTE: Orange County Courts do not grant this power unless there are circumstances warranting such power to be granted)
  7. Decisions regarding the social and sexual contacts of the  (NOTE: Orange County Courts do not grant this power unless there are circumstances warranting such power to be granted)

-Question
I don’t want a “partial” conservatorship. I want “full” conservatorship and not a “Limited” Conservatorship. Why is it called a “Limited” Conservatorship?

Answer
California has several types of Conservatorships. These include the General Conservatorship, General Conservatorship with Dementia Powers, Mental Health Conservatorship (MHC) and the Limited Conservatorship. Each Conservatorship will apply to the type of medical condition/disability your child has.

For example, an adult that has been diagnosed with Dementia will require a General Conservatorship with Dementia Powers; a person with a Developmental Delay will require a Limited Conservatorship because they are restricted to the powers listed above. Note, however, that those powers listed cover all the needs of the disabled adult. Remember: The role of the Limited Conservatorship is to promote the independence of the adult with the Developmental Delay. This is why they call it ‘limited’, because courts want to promote the independence of the child.

Likewise, an adult with other mental health disorders, such as uncontrollable addictions, bipolar disorders, schizophrenia and other related brain disorders will require a MHC; whereas an adult that suffered a stroke, is in a coma due to accident or other will require a General Conservatorship.

The only difference between a general conservatorship and a limited conservatorship is that the powers as noted above are specifically listed in the Petition for Limited Conservatorship, whereas the general conservatorship petition does not. Otherwise, the authority is generally the same (medical, educational, contracts, etc.).

-Question
Why do I need to get a conservatorship over my son/daughter, if I am the parent and have always made decisions for him/her, and he/she is disabled?

Answer
Once your child turns 18, he/she automatically becomes an adult and even as a parent, you lose all authority to make decisions for them. This is because the Constitution gives human beings certain fundamental rights, such as the right to marry, procreate, vote, travel, etc.  By signing and making decisions on behalf of another adult – even an adult with a disability – you are unintentionally violating those rights, which makes it illegal.

In order to avoid this and make your decision-making on behalf of an adult with a disability legal, you need to obtain the permission via a Conservatorship. In this way, you can continue as a parent and/or family member to make decisions on behalf of your child and/or loved one.

REMEMBER: You are not “taking” these powers away from the Conservatee, you are merely granted the authority to assist them in making decisions as it relates to the powers above that are being granted to you. You are limiting their rights, but this does not mean your dependent loses all rights.

As a parent, you should never stop involving your child in the decision-making process; they should be part of it. The goal is to assist them in independent living. With your help and oversight using these powers, they can achieve this. In fact, even after a Conservator is appointed in court, the Conservatee still retains certain rights, such as the right to retain his/her own attorney and others.

-Question
When should I begin the process?

Answer
If you plan to obtain a conservatorship, it is important to start the process when your child is age 17 years and 6 months.  The process takes anywhere between about 4-8 months due to the prolonged court process and full court calendars. We suggest that you discuss your intent to obtain conservatorship with your child who has the disability (who will soon be an adult).  We suggest that you explain the process of the Conservatorship, what it is and what it is being obtained for so that your child comes in with the understanding of why there will be court involvement.

-Question
Will the COVID-19 pandemic affect the process?

Answer
During the COVID 19 Crisis, we suggest attempting to begin the process a year in advance of your child’s 18th birthday, since courts are even more delayed in filings and hearings due to the court closure. Any filings submitted during the time of the crisis may not be heard until the following year.

-Question
How Can I make Legal Decisions during the COVID-19 Crisis? Am I able to obtain Conservatorship through the Court, at this time?

Answer
Currently the courts are closed due to the COVID-19 crisis. Unless your child is experiencing a life-threatening condition (life support decisions in medical care) or financial threatening emergency (such as foreclosure to property, etc.), a judge will not hear your matter during the closure.

You may begin the process of completing the paperwork required to submit a Petition for Conservatorship, and even file it, but court filings are also left on queue. It is best to begin /file your Petition now, though, so that the court will file it as soon as they are able once they reopen.

In the meantime, you are not able to make a “legal decision” on behalf of your child who is 18 years old or older. While we encourage you to assist/encourage good decision-making, there is no legal authority under which you can make a legal decision. In an emergency, however, physicians will always act to save the life of a person regardless of legal paperwork on hand.

-Question
Won’t a Power of Attorney signed by my disabled child be sufficient?

Answer
Not necessarily. In order to execute a valid power of attorney (POA), the disabled child granting you the power to make decisions on his/her behalf must have the sufficient mental capacity (understanding of what he/she is signing and the consequences thereof). If your child does not understand the consequences of his/her signature, or what he/she is giving to you, then there is no sufficient capacity and a valid power of attorney cannot be established. The person granting you powers under the POA must understand fully what they are doing. If a person has a physical disability but understands what they are signing (i.e. their mental capacity is at par), then a POA would be sufficient.

-Question
How long does the Conservatorship last?

Answer
The Conservatorship lasts until you petition the court to terminate it; the court [Investigator] feels it is no longer necessary; and/or the death of the Conservatee or Conservator.

Question
What happens if the Conservator(s) does not act in the best interest of the disabled adult?

Answer
After a Conservator is appointed by the court, the court assigns an investigator to your case.  This investigator conducts home visits to the place of residence of the Conservatee. This is done annually, and gradually decreases to a visit every two years, every five years, and so on as the investigator deems appropriate.  If the investigator, during his routine visit, realizes or suspects that the Conservators are not caring for the adult as they are obliged to, the investigator will file a statement in the annual report and submit it to the court for review.  If the judge finds that the Conservators are not acting in the best interest of the adult, he/she will order that the Conservators attend another hearing to give them the opportunity to explain the investigator’s findings.  Depending on the outcome of that, the judge may or may not terminate the conservatorship and assign another responsible willing adult to become Conservator in place of the previous one(s).

-Question
What happens if the adult with the disability moves to another state and is already under Conservatorship in this state?

Answer
The Conservatee can go out of state during the Conservatorship, for visits, vacations and other temporary outings.  However, if the Conservatee permanently resides in another state, the Conservatorship where it was initially established terminates, and a new Petition must be filed in the new state. The court must always be informed of any moves or changes of address, even if in state. Moreover, some courts require that you petition for approval to move the Conservatee to another state permanently.

-Question
What happens if I decide not to obtain Conservatorship?

Answer
Parents and/or family members may not be able to make decisions on behalf of the adult.  Moreover, physicians may not permit the parents to sign on behalf of their disabled adult child without a conservatorship.  If a physician permits a parent to sign without a conservatorship, that physician puts his/her medical license at risk. Some physicians permit this without knowing the risk.

-Question
What happens if there is an emergency and I do not have Conservatorship?

Answer
In an emergency most physicians will act to save the life of the Conservatee without consent, and later obtain consent from either the Conservatee him/herself, or the legal Conservator, or even the director of the Regional Center.  The court may also assign a temporary conservator in an emergency situation – but this must be petitioned in court by the person wishing to obtain conservatorship – it must also be reasonable in time (i.e., if a surgery is needed same day to avoid putting the adult’s life at risk, there is no time to go to court that same day to petition).

-Question
If I am the Conservator of the adult with the disability, am I responsible for any crimes the Conservatee commits? (Example: assault/battery)

Answer
No. Unless you were negligent in causing the crime (example: you knew of threats the disabled adult gave to another and you still failed to monitor and/or give medication to control such behavior).  You can only be liable for YOUR negligence in caring for the disabled adult. You can also be accused of a crime if you abuse and/or neglect the adult with the disability or take advantage of their financial affairs.

-Question
Does my Attorney also represent the disabled adult (the Conservatee)?

Answer
No. When you submit the Petition to the court, the Attorney you hire represents you, but the court automatically assigns a public defender to represent the interests of the disabled adult.

-Question
How can I get in contact with an attorney that practices Conservatorship Law at Community Legal Aid So Cal?

Answer
You can call the hotline at 1-800-834-5001 and inform them of your intent to file a petition for Conservatorship on behalf of a disabled adult.

En Español

Preguntas Frecuentes – Conservación Limitada, General & COVID-19 Relacionadas

-Pregunta

Tengo un hijo con un retraso en el desarrollo. Necesita ayuda con sus necesidades personales y actividades de la vida diaria. ¿Puedo hacerlo sin la participación de la Corte?

Respuesta

Usted puede ayudar a su hijo tanto como él / ella requieres, y usted desea / son capaces de. Sin embargo, con el fin de tomar decisiones legales en su nombre, tales como la firma de contratos en solicitudes SSI, Medi Cal u otros beneficios públicos; o médico o educativo consiente en enumerar unos pocos, usted debe ser nombrado por un juez como conservador (tutor legal para un adulto con una discapacidad) en una tutela limitada.

-Pregunta

¿Qué es una conservación limitada?

Respuesta

Una tutela limitada es una tutela que se aplica sólo a adultos con retrasos en el desarrollo y cuyas condiciones surgieron antes de los 18 años.  El tribunal otorga la tutela limitada a un adulto responsable (conocido como el Conservador) y con eso viene el derecho del Conservador a tomar decisiones en nombre del adulto con la discapacidad.

Una tutela limitada se denomina «limitada» porque se solicita un conjunto de poderes específicos y se concede al Conservador.  Además, se llama una tutela limitada porque el propósito es “promover la independencia del adulto discapacitado”.

-Question

¿Qué tipos de decisiones puede tomar un conservador al cuidar al adulto con discapacidad?

Respuesta

En una tutela limitada, el juez otorgará al adulto responsable (es decir, al Conservador), el poder de tomar ciertas decisiones en nombre del adulto con discapacidad (es decir, el “Conservatorio”).   El juez otorgará los siguientes poderes en una tutela limitada, y por lo tanto el Conservador puede tomar decisiones relacionadas con lo siguiente:

  1. Decidir dónde el conservatorio es el más adecuado para vivir (es decir, casa de grupo, residencia personal, con un miembro de la familia, etc.) .
  2. Tener acceso a registros confidenciales.
  3. Firmar contratos e introducir  contratos en su nombre..
  4. Consentimiento a tratamientos y procedimientos médicos. (excepto  la esterilización – usted debe obtener una orden judicial para esterilizar a un adulto con una discapacidad incluso con una tutela)
  5. Decisiones con respecto a la educación
  6. Decisiones relacionadas con el Conservatorio en Matrimonio. (NOTA: Los Tribunales del Condado de Orange no otorgan este poder a menos que existan circunstancias que justifiquen que se conceda tal poder)
  7. Decisiones sobre los contactos sociales y sexuales del Conservatorio. (NOTA: Los Tribunales del Condado de Orange no otorgan este poder a menos que existan circunstancias que justifiquen que se conceda tal poder)

-Pregunta

No quiero una tutela “parcial”. Quiero una tutela “completa” y no una tutela “limitada”. ¿Por qué se llama una Conservación “Limitada”?

Respuesta

California tiene varios tipos de conservaciones. Estos incluyen la Conservación General, la Conservación General con Poderes de Demencia, la Conservación de Salud Mental (MHC) y la Conservación Limitada. Cada conservación se aplicará al tipo de condición médica/discapacidad que su hijo tiene.

Por ejemplo, un adulto que ha sido diagnosticado con Demencia requerirá una Conservación General con Poderes de Demencia; una persona con un Retraso en el Desarrollo requerirá una Conservación Limitada porque están restringidas a los poderes mencionados anteriormente. Tenga en cuenta, sin embargo, que los poderes enumerados cubren todas las necesidades del adultodiscapacitado. Recuerde: El papel de la Conservación Limitada es promover la independencia del adulto con el Retraso del Desarrollo. Es por eso que lo llaman “limitado”, porque los tribunales quieren promover la independencia del niño.

Del mismo modo, un adulto con otros trastornos de salud mental, tales como adicciones incontrolables, trastornos bipolares, esquizofrenia y otros trastornos cerebrales relacionados requerirá un MHC; mientras que un adulto que sufrió un accidente cerebrovascular está en coma debido a un accidente u otro requerirá una Conservación General.

La única diferencia entre una tutela general y una tutela limitada es que las facultades como se señaló anteriormente se enumeran específicamente en la Petición de Conservación Limitada, mientras que la petición de tutela general no lo hace. De lo contrario, la autoridad es generalmente la misma (médica, educativa, contractual, etc.).

-Pregunta

¿Por qué necesito una tutela sobre mi hijo/hija, si soy el padre y siempre he tomado decisiones por él / ella, y él / ella está discapacitado?

Respuesta

Una vez que su hijo cumple 18 años, se convierte automáticamente en un adulto e incluso como padre, usted pierde toda autoridad para tomar decisiones por ellos. Esto se debe a que la Constitución otorga a los seres humanos ciertos derechos fundamentales, como el derecho a casarse, procrear, votar, viajar, etc.  Al firmar y tomar decisiones en nombre de otro adulto, incluso un adulto con una discapacidad, usted está violando involuntariamente esos derechos, lo que lo hace ilegal.

Con el fin de evitar esto y hacer que su toma de decisiones en nombre de un adulto con una discapacidad legal, usted necesita obtener el permiso a través de una conservación. De esta manera, usted puede continuar como padre y/o miembro de la familia para tomar decisiones en nombre de su hijo y/o ser querido.

RECUERDE: Usted no está “quitando” estos poderes del Conservatorio, simplemente se le concede la autoridad para ayudarles en la toma de decisiones en lo que se refiere a los poderes anteriores que se le están otorgando. Usted está limitando sus derechos, pero esto no significa que su dependiente pierda todos los derechos.

Como padre, usted nunca debe dejar de involucrar a su hijo en el proceso de toma de decisiones; deberían ser parte de ello. El objetivo es ayudarles en la vida independiente. Con su ayuda y supervisión usando estos poderes, pueden lograr esto. De hecho, incluso después de que un conservador es nombrado en la corte, el Conservatorio todavía conserva ciertos derechos, como el derecho a retener a su propio abogado y otros.

-Question

¿Cuándo debo begin el process?

Respuesta

Si planea obtener una tutela, es importante comenzar el proceso cuando su hijo tenga 17 años y 6 meses.  El proceso toma entre 4-8 meses debido al proceso prolongado de la corte y calendarios judiciales completos. Le sugerimos que hable sobre su intención de obtener la tutela con su hijo que tiene la discapacidad (que pronto será un adulto).  Le sugerimos que explique el proceso de la Conservación, qué es y para qué se está obteniendo para que su hijo venga con la comprensión de por qué habrá participación en la corte.

-Pregunta

¿Afectará la pandemia COVID-19 al proceso?

Respuesta

Durante la Crisis COVID 19, sugerimos intentar comenzar el proceso con un año antes del 18cumpleaños de su hijo, ya que los tribunales se retrasan aún más en las presentaciones y audiencias debido al cierre de la corte. Cualquier presentación presentada durante el tiempo de la crisis no podrá ser escuchada hasta el año siguiente.

-Pregunta

¿Cómo puedo tomar decisiones legales durante la crisis COVID-19? ¿Puedo obtener la Conservación a través de la Corte, en este momento?

Respuesta

Actualmente los tribunales están cerrados debido. a la crisis COVID-19. A menos que su hijo esté experimentando una condición potencialmente mortal (decisiones de soporte vital en atención médica) o una emergencia de amenaza financiera (como la ejecución hipotecaria de la propiedad, etc.), un juez no escuchará su asunto durante el cierre.

Usted puede comenzar el proceso de completar la documentación requerida para presentar una Petición de Conservación, e incluso presentarla, pero las presentaciones judiciales también se dejan en cola. Lo mejor es comenzar / presentar su Petición ahora, sin embargo, para que el tribunal la presente tan pronto como puedan una vez que se vuelvan a abrir.

Mientras tanto, usted no puede tomar una “decisión legal” en nombre de su hijo que tiene 18 años o más. Si bien le animamos a ayudar/alentar una buena toma de decisiones, no hay autoridad legal bajo la cual pueda tomar una decisión legal. En una emergencia, sin embargo, los médicos siempre actuarán para salvar la vida de una persona independientemente de la documentación legal a mano.

-Pregunta

¿No será suficiente un poder notarial firmado por mi hijo discapacitado?

Respuesta

No necesariamente. Para ejecutar un poder notarial válido (POA), el niño disabled que le otorga el poder de tomar decisiones en su nombre debe tener la capacidad mental suficiente (comprensión de lo que está firmando y las consecuencias de la misma). Si su hijo no entiende las consecuencias de su firma, o lo que le está dando, entonces no hay capacidad suficiente y no se puede establecer un poder notarial válido. La persona que le otorga poderes bajo el POA debe entender completamente lo que está haciendo. Si una persona tiene una discapacidad física pero entiende lo que está firmando (es decir, su capacidad mental está a la par), entonces un POA sería suficiente.

-Pregunta

¿Cuánto dura la Conservación?

Respuesta

La Conservación dura hasta que usted solicita al corte que lo termine; el courte [Investigador] considera que ya no es necesario; y /o la muerte del Conservatorio o Conservador.

Pregunta

¿Qué sucede si el(los) conservador(es)es no actúa en el mejor interés del adulto discapacitado?

Respuesta

Después de que un conservador es nombrado por el court, el tribunal asigna un investigador a su caso.  Este investigador realiza visitas domiciliarias al lugar de residencia del Conservatorio. Esto se hace anualmente, y disminuye gradualmente a una visita cada dos años, cada cinco años, y así sucesivamente como el investigator lo considere apropiado.  Si el investigator, durante su visita de rutina, se da cuenta o sospecha que los Conservadores no están cuidando al adulto como están obligados a hacerlo, el i nvestigator  ipresentaráuna declaración en el informe anual y la presentará al  court para su revisión.  Si el juez determina que los Conservadores no están actuando en el mejor interés del adulto, ordenará que los Conservadores asistan a otra audiencia para darles la oportunidad de explicar los hallazgos del investigator.  Dependiendo del resultado de eso, el juez puede o no puede terminar la tutela y asignar a otro adulto dispuesto a convertirse en Conservador en lugar de la(s) anterior(es).

-Question

¿Qué sucede si el adulto con la discapacidad se muda a otro estado y ya está bajo conservación en este estado?

Respuesta

El Conservatorio puede salir del estado durante la Conservación, para visitas, vacaciones y otras salidas temporales.  Sin embargo, si el Conservatorio  reside permanentemente en otro estado, la Conservación donde se estableció inicialmente termina, y una nueva Petición debe ser presentada en el nuevo estado. El tribunal siempre debe ser informado de cualquier movimiento o cambio de dirección, incluso si está en estado. Además, algunos tribunales requieren que solicite la aprobación para trasladar el Conservatorio a otro estado de forma permanente.

-Pregunta: ¿Qué sucede si decido no obtener Conservación?

Respuesta

Es posible que los padres y/o los miembros de la familia no puedan tomar decisiones en nombre del adulto.  Además, los médicos no pueden permitir que los padres firmen en nombre de su hijo adulto discapacitado sin una tutela.  Si un médico permite que un padre firme sin una tutela, ese médico pone su licencia médica en riesgo. Algunos médicos lo permiten sin conocer el riesgo.

-Question

¿Qué sucede si hay una emergencia y no tengo conservación?

Respuesta

En una emergencia, la mayoría de los médicos actuarán para salvar la vida del Conservatorio sin consentimiento, y más tarde obtendrán el consentimiento del Conservatorio, o del Conservador legal, o incluso del director del Centro Regional.  El tribunal también puede asignar un conservador temporal en una situación de emergencia – pero esto debe ser solicitado en la corte por la persona que desea obtener la tutela – también debe ser razonable en el tiempo (es decir, si se necesita una cirugía elmismo día para evitar poner la vida del adulto en riesgo, no hay tiempo para ir a la corte ese mismo día para solicitar).

-Question

Si soy el Conservador del adulto con la capacidadde ser, ¿soy responsable de cualquier crimen quecomete el Conservatorio? (Ejemplo: asalto/batería)

Respuesta

No. A menos que fuera negligente al causar el crimen(ejemplo:  usted sabía de amenazas que el discapacitado dio undult a otro y todavía no pudo monitorear y / o dar medicamentos para controlar tal comportamiento).  Usted sólo puede ser responsable de su negligencia en el cuidado de los discapacitados undult. También puede ser acusado de un delito si abusa y/o descuida al adulto con la discapacidad o se aprovecha de sus asuntos financieros.

-Question

¿Mi Abogado también representa al adulto discapacitado (el Conservatorio)?

Respuesta

No. Cuando usted envía la Petición al tribunal, el Abogado que contrata lo representa, pero el  court asigna automáticamente a un defensor público para representar los intereses del adulto discapacitado.

-Pregunta

¿Cómo mepuse en contacto con un abogado que practica la Ley deConservación en Community Legal Aid So Cal?

Puede llamar a la línea directa al 1-800-834-5001 e informarles de su intención de presentar una petición para la Conservación en nombre de un adulto discapacitado.